Dating 20th century photos


03-Aug-2017 20:18

Compared to their most important predecessor, the daguerreotype, tintypes were not only very inexpensive, they were also relatively easy and quick to make.A photographer could prepare, expose, develop and varnish a tintype plate and have it ready for the customer in a few minutes.Although prints on paper soon displaced them as the most common type of photograph, the tintype process continued to enjoy considerable use throughout the 19th century and beyond, especially for casual portraiture by novelty and street photographers.John Coffer, a featured photographer in the New York Times, travels by horse-drawn wagon creating tintypes.In 1856 it was patented by Hamilton Smith in the United States and by William Kloen in the United Kingdom.It was first called melainotype, then ferrotype by a rival manufacturer of the iron plates used, then finally tintype.It was perhaps the most acutely hazardous of all the several highly toxic chemicals originally used in this and many other early photographic processes.One unusual piece of tintype equipment was a twelve-lensed camera that could make a dozen Each tintype is usually a camera original, so the image is usually a mirror image, reversed left to right from reality.

To obtain as light-toned an image as possible, potassium cyanide, a very dangerous and powerful deadly poison, was normally employed as the photographic fixer.

The areas with the least amount of silver, corresponding to the darkest areas of the subject, were essentially transparent and appeared black when seen against the dark background provided by the lacquer.